Tag Archive | Musical Interlude

Slightly Surreal

It’s the end of the world, the zombie apocalypse.  BigCity is full of zombies and people trying to get past them to safety.  And what am I doing during at the end of the world as we know it? I’m sat astride my response bike, watching it all happen.

This is 2.8 Hours Later, and the aim of the game is to get from check point to check point without being caught by the zombies.  We’re providing first aid cover, ready and waiting for the inevitable slips, trips, falls, and out right head on collisions.  Needless to say, the event is hilarious to watch, and it appears the players are loving it as well.

We get a patient, one of the zombies.  We ask the typical questions, get a medical history (‘so how long have you been dead?’), all while keeping an eye open for the next batch of players to sprint down the high street.  In the corner of the square, a busker is setting up his guitar and amp, another person going about his business while the world ends around him.

We here the next group running, so we cyclists dodge out of sight, while our zombie friend lurches to hide in a phone box.  The running steps slow and stop, and we can just see the group looking down at their map to work out where to go next.  They wonder down the high street, paying far too much attention to the piece of paper in their hands, and not their surroundings.

A groan, a blur of speed from the zombie, and then screams as the group scatters, desperately keeping out of his reach.  The whole group races past where CycleGuy and I are hiding, barely missing the posts we’re propped up behind, intent only on avoiding the zombie on their collective tails.

And in the background, music drifts over from the corner…

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Response Cycling Rant

I have worked hard to achieve my role of cycle responder. The course isn’t particularly difficult, but keeping in mind most people have done no training at all, it holds you to a particularly high standard. It also has a particular focus on working in crowds of people safely (you should see some of the maneuvers we’re expected to pull off). Just like anyone else operating an emergency vehicle, we’re supposed to be good at what we do.

Now, I freely admit that there are some idiots on bikes wandering around.  This is an unfortunate side effect of the lack of licensing of bicycles.  Not that I advocate such a license: we need to encourage people to cycle, not make it difficult for them.  (Before anyone interjects that a driving license isn’t difficult to get, I’ll point out that, at 23, I am still unable to drive a car due to the financial investment driving lessons require.)  Proper planning, a bit of common courtesy amongst road users and decent provision of dedicated cycle ways should help keep these few idiots safe and out-of-the-way, keeping all parties safe.

We, on the other hand, are response cyclists.  We are not just cycling as a means to get to work, or to the shops.  Our role has two main parts, in order of importance (in my opinion):

  1. Responding to calls for assistance from the public, other first aiders and the ambulance service
  2. Patrolling an event, forming a highly visible first aid presence that can be flagged down when needed

To a lesser degree, we also make good a good advert for the Organisation, as we are very visible and something people don’t see every day.  (This is something I think we should capitalise on more…)

Now it is fairly obvious that most of our patients will be found in areas where there are most people, and so it is almost inevitable that we mainly respond to places where there is a crowd.  This isn’t even allowing for the fact that crowds invariably form around patients.  Given that many of our patients are reported as being quite unwell, this means that we will need to respond fast through said crowds.  The most effective way of progressing quickly through a crowd is to make a lot of noise, encourage people to move out of our way (whether with noise makers, voices, “blues and twos” or whatever) and pass through the gaps that naturally form in such groups.  It is exactly the same technique as walking quickly through a crowd (which most people can do without thinking), but at higher speeds and with bigger turning circles.  It’s not perfect (it doesn’t work in very dense crowds) but it still usually gets us on scene faster than a foot patrol (we can take advantage of larger gaps to put on decent bursts of speed) or an ambulance (which can’t exactly dodge and weave in the ways we can).  Sometimes it’s only a minute or so faster, but when someone is very unwell, every minute counts.

Unfortunately, to make it work, sometimes we have to cut things fine.  Sometimes I will pass someone by inches then swerve suddenly in front of them to swing through another gap.  I try to make myself known to everyone, but sometimes I’ll catch people by surprise.  This doesn’t (and I say this with feeling) mean that I’ve nearly hit you.  Believe me, if 45 kg of bike plus 60 kg of rider nearly hit you, you’d know.  In fact, the first thing you’d know of it would be the screech of brakes as I come to a halt behind you.  Because, just like that emergency vehicle going down the road, I never go so fast I can’t stop if I need to.  I have a lot of momentum, but very good brakes and plenty of practice emergency stopping.  I’ll say it again, because I mean it: I am not going to hit you (well unless you decide to jump in front of me at the last-minute, and that, I’m afraid, would be your fault).

On the other hand, when I’m on a patrol, I’m not in a hurry.  In fact, I’m particularly keen to save energy for the times when I really need it.  This means I’m going to move slowly.  Of cause, all velocity is relative, and slow for a cyclists doesn’t always mean the same thing as slow for a pedestrian.  Sometimes the crowd sprawled across my patrol path decides they want to dawdle down the street, taking in the sights.  And why not?  After all, most of the time they are on a day out, and who wants to rush around on a day out.

This makes cycling patrols a very different activity to normal cycling.  On a clear road, we’ll move at roughly normal to slow cycling speeds, stopping sometimes to take in the sights ourselves (everyone loves a bit of people watching).  Then we hit that dense bit of dawdling crowd, and so we slow down, down to the speed of the crowd.  This takes practice; a bike are very difficult to control at such speeds, particularly given the weight of our bikes.  That is precisely why we spend so much time on cone skills and low-speed maneuvering.

Once we’re down to the speed of a dawdle, we can quite happily sit there indefinitely.  We’re happy to wait until the crowd disperses, a gap in the crowd forms naturally, or we have a reason to speed up (usually a job from control).  Of cause, if people move aside to let us through (which happens fairly often once people notice us), we do appreciate it, and we’ll pop through any gap that forms (naturally or otherwise) to move from behind a crowd if the timing is right.  We know that sitting behind people makes them uncomfortable.  That said, if that’s where we have to stay, so be it.  We’ll wait.

Yet again, and I say this with more feeling this time, you are NOT going to get run over.  If we have to stop, we will, no problems, no arguments.

People often mention that we should get off and walk when we’re doing this, often adding that they think we’ll get through faster.  There are a couple of problems with that argument.

First, while we are riding our bikes, they are surprisingly manoeuvrable and easy to handle.  These bikes are HEAVY (have I mentioned this enough yet…) and being able to use your body weight to balance them is extremely useful.  As soon as I get off my bike, I exchange 45 kg of well-balanced bicycle for 45 kg of unstable dead weight.  More than once I have lost my bike when I have had to get off and push, and when those bikes go, they go big style.  I am much more likely to drop that bike on your (and my) shins when I push it than I am to run you over or collide with you while cycling.

Second, these bikes are a real pain to mount and dismount in a crowd.  During these times, that 60 kg of rider that could be used to balance the bike is attempting to swing his leg over the bike and position himself on his saddle, all while trying to keep that 45 kg of bike upright during the inherently unstable procedure.  Having to do this in a hurry, while talking to Control on the radio and keeping an eye on where he is going (not to mention where everything and everyone else is going) is a serious challenge.  We are rapid response vehicles, and like I said before, every minute can count.

In short, constantly getting on and off the bikes is a pain, and staying on is much easier, safer (and highly encouraged by our training).

I appreciate that bikes are unusual, and seeing a fully laden response bike bearing down on you is intimidating.  It is my eternal hope that people will eventually get used to response bikes and begin to understand how they behave.  If nothing else, I hope people start to realise that we are an emergency vehicle, and just like any other emergency vehicle, the operator really does now what they are doing.

I was going to leave you with two things.  The first was a relatively old advert that I really like about how to respond to an oncoming blue light vehicle (in this case, and ambulance).  Unfortunately my Google skills have let me down and I can’t find it…  The second (which I have found) is my customary musical interlude (on both YouTube and Spotify), this time a track from a band I have just started listening to again after having been forgotten for quite some time.  Enjoy.

An Update

I know I said I would do a series of posts on observations, and I still intend to, but at the moment real life is just getting in the way. This is just a quick update of what’s happening, and the next post will be about something I really need to get off of my chest.

So, I am rapidly approaching the end of my degree. My final report is due next Tuesday, and after the Thursday after that, I am done. Finished. Leaving my university and likely not coming back (except for graduation based stuff).

I’m not going to lie, it’s a scary prospect. Not accounting for my work placement, I’ve been in full-time education for 19 years. It is literally the only thing I can remember doing. As of September, I start on the beginning of what (at the moment, at least) will be a career in Engineering. Real engineering (it doesn’t get any more real than jet engines…), where the work I do actually has a real purpose.

I will be leaving behind what I know and am comfortable with, a huge number of my friends, and all the other benefits of student life. This is scary beyond belief…

In other news, I am currently bike-less again, as some idiot drove over the front wheel of my bike (fortunately while I wasn’t on it). Needless to say, this is very annoying, not least because I am currently sat on a bus that takes the most roundabout route home possible.

This year I am not going to the graduation ball. In fact, this is the first time since starting university that I’ve not been there in some kind of first aid capacity, and I have zero interest in going as a punter. I had intended to go as first aid, but I haven’t been asked yet, and the unit has upset one of my good friends, so we’ve decided to go on duty the next morning instead. The person who did the upsetting is now also not going, but I have managed to persuade my friend that it isn’t her problem any more (and so she doesn’t need to pick up the pieces after the very likely meltdown).

Speaking of meltdowns, the local adult division is currently having a very slow one. Three of the more progressive members have been made to feel very unwelcome, and so have walked away. As a result, their training program is steadily going down the pan, morale is going to drop (as people realise what they’ve lost), and its all going to go to hell. Of the units six-ish active ambulance qualified volunteers, they now have two actively refusing to do events, two prioritising county level events (me and CycleGuy), leaving two to (fail to) meet the units commitments (meaning other units have to help out).

On the bright side, my unit of young people is going strong.  We have just had a very successful sponsored walk (where I got to legitimately play tag for the first time since I left junior school), and have half a dozen things planned for the near future.

Work is still being its normal irritating self (but that’s retail for you), and I’m doing far too many hours for the Organisation (no change there, then), and for the most part I’m enjoying myself.

When things start settling down, I will try to post more frequency.  For now, I will get on when I can, and I’m still on Twitter (my lifeline when drowning in my project).

Now, to finish, another musical interlude.  Enjoy 🙂

Spotify

Okay, random aside here inspire by the musical interlude in that last post.

I LOVE Spotify.  I signed up for a premium membership a little while back, and I haven’t looked back.

I know I could just buy the tracks I want from Amazon or somewhere, and I’d probably spend less overall, but the convenience of adding a track or twenty to a playlist, without having to worry about the price, and not minding if I ditch it again if I don’t like it, is just amazing.  Add that to the fact that I can take the music anywhere I have wi-fi access on my tablet and my phone.  That’s over three hundred tracks, all in high quality, available on a device that couldn’t store a quarter of that.

Anyway, with that little sales pitch over, I will again leave you with some music.  This time, it’s the piece I love most out of the Chicago soundtrack.  I learnt to play a bit of this in a medley while in the school concert band, and while the melody isn’t that complex, it’s fiddly enough to be challenging, and when done properly, amazingly good fun to play.

I also think the performance in the film is amazing, but given that I’m a big fan of the film overall, there’s no real surprise there…

So, I leave you with Sean Palmer – We Both Reached For The Gun

(Regrettably I’m not paid by Spotify or anyone else to promote their service. I just happen to be a big fan of it.)

Morale

Morale seems to have hit an all-time low in the adult branch of the Organisation recently (or more specifically in this county, I can’t really comment on anywhere else).  Attendance at duties is poor, attendance at training isn’t much better, my local Adult unit is about ready to tear itself apart and nobody can be bothered to change anything.  For someone like me, who is really passionate about my work with the Organisation, this sucks.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m not worried that everything is going to collapse around my ears.  At present, we have far too much momentum to do that.  It’s just seeing all the wonderful things we could be doing, and all the effort that people at all levels are putting in, and it just getting bogged down in a marsh of apathy, really gets me down.

Take the bikes.  They are in dire need of some TLC, and the entire unit needs some strong leadership to get it back on its feet.  It’s holding on in there, but only because there’s a few of us who won’t let it lie down and die.  I know for a fact that there are people in positions of responsibility who would quite happily allow it to just fade away.  They are doing a wonderful job of not letting us change anything.

Part of the problem is that the Organisation is going to be going through a restructuring at some point in the next year.  Almost every position above unit leader level (like mine) will essentially be up for redefinition and reappointment, meaning that, when it’s all done, everything could change.  In principle this is fine.  It’ll mean a few fewer Chiefs, but most of us Indians won’t notice.  In fact, given some of the members of senior staff in county office (lead cyclist included…), this could be a very good thing.

Unfortunately, everyone is using this as a reason not to make any changes to anything, as it might get changed back again later.

In my mind, this is a crap response.  We shouldn’t be leaving things in a bad way, just in case our changes prove pointless.  These things need changing now, not in however many months time, and I really think that this is contributing to our problems.  County management don’t seem to care, so why should we lowly people on the ground (or on wheels, if your that way inclined…)  There are a few of us trying to sort things out, but we keep getting fobbed off with this excuse, and it’s starting to get old…


And now, after that little rant, a musical interlude inspired by Zemanta‘s suggested links and tags:


Or if you have Spotify: All Time Low – Forget About It

Watch out, the video isn’t strictly safe for work (assuming your work even allows YouTube).

Perhaps I could make this a new feature…

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